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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
. john thorn writing in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick convers
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ >> read my lips. ♪ >> jennifer: you are back inside "the war room." i'm jennifer granholm. if you feel like there has been a lot more presidential campaign tv commercials this year than there was in 2008, you would be right. four years ago, about 637,000 adsed a aired at this point in the race. this year, that number has sky rock setted to 915,000 commercials, a 44% increase. unbelievable. enough to make you long for the days when political tv ads were a novelty. well, tonight in part two of our eight-part series the selling of the presidents. barry lank takes us back to when it all began. >> it was 1952 television was the big new thing. >> eisenhower answers america. >> dwight eisenhower's team lead the way to bring the candidate right into america's living rooms. >> help me put the lid on crazy government spending. >> the ads were very effective. they made more than 40 eisenhower america spots. >> the camera in eisenhower was l
, last generation of economists who thought in these terms and thought of economics as a moral science. and that you needed to ask always the question enough for what, what is money for? otherwise you are adrift. you just go on accumulating without end, without purpose. so he said enough for a good life. and he thought that technology was bringing that about. that it was actually producing such increases in wealth that we would be able to have abundance with a fraction of the work. that people would then do it. but that bit of it hasn't come about. >> why? >> i think a number of explanations. one is that our society's become much more unequal than it was when canes was writing. the other is i think he underestimated the force of insatiability. the relative character -- >> you end up with new needs and new wants. if you have one car, you feel like maybe it will be even more fun to have three. in the book it seems to me -- correct me if i'm wrong -- briefly what you're saying is you need enough for a good what we would consider good or upper middle class in terms of material comforts, ho
in science, technology, engineering and math. what would you suggest be done to produce more graduates in those areas? >> moderator: this will go first to mr. howell. howell: this is right up my alley, val. i love technology. i think this is the greatest thing. we have to start in preschool. we have to emphasize that science, technology, engineering, math are key to growing our economy. but i'd also add in the a word, and that's art. you know, at ibm some of our very finest software developers that create the apps that we all use are very, very culturally-aware, and they're the artsy ones. but they take the science and technology. we've got to invest in beginning in preschool and going all the way through k-12. from the federal government, no child left behind left everyone behind. we need to take those dollars and reinvest them back into our education system near utah today. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: there's a lot of what scott said here is true, and i appreciate him saying it. and we in utah are known for one of the best software valleys in the country. i'm the republican h
and from here it's going to go up. the tidal predictions are to the exact science. it's almost like river forecasts. the high drolgss make them with the best knowledge they have. it's not as good as your forecast we give you days in advan advance. it's not the exact science. fluid situation with the storm and a lot of factors and so right now, we're thinking it's going to be about two to three feet higher than what we saw when it was down here on the edge splashing over. that means if i was standing right here at about 8:30 this evening, the water could potentially be somewhere between here to here with wave action over the top of that. this is a flat area in lower manhattan. not a lot of elevation change. about three blocks in inland they have the subways all sandbagged. they are expecting the worst and the possibility of all the water heading underground to the subway system. normally it's heavy rains. they do get flooded. this is saltwater. the electrical switches, all the problems they could have with that. think of the nightmare they would have trying to replace that stuff if it got
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> andrea: there are a lot of things to consider when picking a partner. their background, religious views, maybe even their political views. with the election in full swing, dating a i cross party lines can create tension. so i hit the streets to find out can politics really ruin relationships? >> do you think politics can ruin relationships? any experience with politics ruining relationships? >> not yet. but that is probably talk about it on the first date. if you get it out of the way, disagree. >> i'm not going to talk about that on my first date. that's not what i'm there for. >> i remember one woman was absolutely beautiful, incredible, smart. but she mentioned the presidential contender i did not like. i walked out of the restaurant. >> i couldn't imagine being married to somebody who was going to vote for obama. or going out with them. my daughter doesn't have a boyfriend yet, right, nick? >> no. >> we don't have a clue which way we want to go yet. >> that way
happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. anything wrong so far. >> greg, how are you? >> fine, thanks. >> did you have a good weekend? >> yes, uneventful. actually i had to work on sunday. i had a special episode of "the five," you know that show i do. >> vaguely. >> i have heard of it. >> it rated well. >> you keep talking about it. debate. miles, you were upset there were no women as part of the debate. how about the fact that for all four debates, the three presidential and the one vice presidential, all of the moderators were white? >> except barack obama who is part hawaii an. >> but he also -- i am talking about the moderators. >> that's disgusting. that's why we call it ameri-cacaca. >> and what about the state of journalism that they thought they couldn't find any qualified moderators of color? >> journalism is saying, hi, i am racist. actually anytime you see someone who is not -- who is white anywhere that is basically saying, hey, i hate blacks. >> really? >> even if you see a white guy walking down the stree. >> he immediately hates b
with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the d.e.a. to do a really radical thing. that would be to use science in determining what substances will and will not be scheduled. because marijuana is on a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the schedule. [applause] anded same goes for -- and the same goes for hemp, which is also a substance for which there are no bad drug effects. there are no bad health and safety effects. yet there are important health benefits. marijuana should be regulated but not in
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >> announcer: meet mary. she loves to shop online with her debit card, and so does bill, an identity thief who stole mary's identity, took over her bank accounts and stole her hard-earned money. now meet jack. after 40 years, he finally saved enough to enjoy retirement. angie, the waitress at jack's favorite diner, is also enjoying his retirement. with just a little information, she's opened up a credit line, draining the equity in jack's home. unfortunately, millions of americans just like you learn all it may take is a little misplaced information to wreak havoc on your life. this is identity theft, and no one helps stop it better than lifelock. see, ordinary credit monitoring services tell you after your identity has been stolen. they may take 30 days to alert you-- too late for jack. lifelock has the most comprehensive identity theft protection available. if mary had lifelock's bank account alerts, she may have been notified in time to help stop it. if j
this election will look at what went wrong and what went right, after this. it is science and they are very talented people. a lot of times they are very accurate. i will say that, it you are for one candidate or another, there is your own emotions that play into this sometimes, if so you will see a poll that maybe is not favorable to you and your party and sometimes your emotions can play into it. for the most part, particularly with these averages, they are generally accurate. host: we did a segment yesterday about understanding polls during the campaign season. if your interested, go to c- span.org and we have the pew research director talked about how and why polls are done. now to thomas in little home, texas, republican -- in little elm. caller: i want to know, for everyone out there, i know people that go to college, whether their parents paid for it or day paige ford themselves, they're very proud they went to college. i cannot figure out why obama, and his wife, have hidden their records and sealed them. guest: well, i don't want to comment directly on that, necessarily, but i will
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. you walk into conventional mattress store, it's really not about you. we have so much technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. this is your body there. you can see a little more pressure in the shoulders and in the hips. ... now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. at sleep numr we've created a collection of innovations dedicated to individualizing your comfort. the sleep number collection, designed around the innovative sleep number bed - a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the exact comfort your body needs. each of your bodies. so whatever you feel like, sleep number's going to provide it for you. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set-but only while supplies last. sale ends soon! you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 st
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >> many say me are cold jobs in ohio. obama administration made the epa a dirty term. >> how it could make a huge difference of who wins the election in the buckeye state. we have an inside look at ohio. >> welcome to cold country ohio eastern and southeastern ohio where mining dots the landscape. pining offers some of the best paying blue collar jobs. >> 60 years 100 percent medical, ten tal. >> they left to be a carpenter. they have 6 miners as a family. >> is the epa a dirty word around here? >> yes, sir. >> i have a little gas on the way in a cold mine dirty coal, fireplace being shut down left and right because of epa. that is not a good word around here. >> that helps explain the signs out here. >> the co-op rate tors are putting a lot of money around here. the signs were printed by co-op rate tors. >> new federal emissions regulations have been tough. in ohio alone a dozen have shut down. 7 ohio coal mines have also closed. they backed president obama in 08 is not endorsing. >> now vote democrat rick auger
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. to start her own interior design business. she's got a growing list of clients she keeps in touch with using e-mail marketing from constantcontact.com. constantcontact is easy and affordable. it lets her send out updates and photos that showcase her expertise and inspire her customers for only $15 a month. [ dog barking ] her dream -- to be the area's hottest interior design office. [ children laughing ] right now, she just dreams of an office. get a free trial at constantcontact.com. >> tonight a new study from the project for excellence in journalism. look at the three major networks evaluating positive and negative coverage of the two presidential candidates. since i don't know what "positive" means, i am throwing that out and i can do that because i'm the anchor of the program. but i absolutely do know what negative means and here's the stats on that. gov. romney, 36% of the coverage has been negative, 63% neutral. nbc, and fox news 12% negative, 60% neutral. join us now from north carolina. berna
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> the finals jobs report before election day has a little something for each campaign. president obama is talk about the new jobs, but gov. romney is focusing on the americans still look for work. here you go. >> he said he was going to focus on creating jobs. instead he focused on obamacare that killed jobs. unemployment is higher today than when barack obama took office. >> today our businesses have created nearly a .5 million new jobs and we learned companies hired more workers in october than at anytime in the last eight months. >> today both candidates battling for the battleground states. we have team coverage. first let's get to ed henry who is traveling with the president. ed, ohio's unemployment rate is lower than the national average, and the polls indicate the president ought to be relatively happy there. >> that's right. the state unemployment right here is 7%. better than the national average. the president also believes he's gott
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >> all right. everybody, five days until the election and here is the latest snapshot on the economy. the private sector added 158,000 jobs in october according to the adp report today. also released today weekly jobless claims, 363,000 in the latest week, that's still a high number, seems to be the new normal, you might call it the new normal if you like excluding the two unusual reports earlier this month, leading to the government jobs report. and last month, a surprise drop in the unemployment rate. that reported 8:30 eastern tomorrow morning and you'll have it hereof course, it will be the last big report before the election. question, would it swing voters either way? right now, it's a dead heat. and the latest poll from fox news have the candidates tied. 46-46. and that's where it stands. look at this, these pictures may look familiar to some of our viewers, gas lines, and this is a lot worse than in the 1970's, this is a common scene in new york and new jersey right now. and many stations don't have power,
and i built a solar car that we raced across the united states. this is not rocket science, folks. this industry has been around a long time. it just requires political leadership. political leadership that my opponent is not willing to exercise. >> the political leadership came from the president of the united states. we both agree coal must be part of america's energy future. it is low cost, it is much cleaner than it was 30 years ago, and i am and all the above energy kind of gal. the energy costs about 5 cents a kilowatt hour. currently, solar energy is four or five times that much. if coal is the fuel of the past, reasonably priced electric bills are a thing of the past. i'm going to fight for those jobs and i will fight for low- cost energy. >> ok. that concludes the first half of our debate. we will take a 60-90 second non- commercial break and we'll be right back with you. thank you. [applause] >> we will go ahead and get the second part of the debate started. as i mentioned, the situation will be reversed in terms of the questioning. the first part of the second half of t
him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> bill: lou's the boss segment tonight. according to the social security administration, the number of measure workers currently on disability all time high in this country. during president obama's term an average of almost 1,000 disability claims every day have been put on the books. here now to explain why, fox news business anchor lou dobbs. okay. look, we know that people get hurt on the job. >> sure. >> or they have debilitating diseases and they can't work anymore. that's a fact. but now it's the highest level in history and we're supposed to have the best medicine in the world so what's going on? >> there is only one logical explanation. and as people have looked at this, is it's risen 20% under the total number of dependents receiving disability. there is only one plausible explanation. and that is that the administration has made dependency a watch word of its administration. and, therefore, they have reduced the standards forever pe
, schools give a break to students who major in math and science and those are most needed for florida's job market and undergrads studying political science, they have fewer job prospects in the state. >> alisyn: lady liberty. >> cool. >> alisyn: the statue's 126 anniversary and the celebration opening up to the public after a year long renovation and 30 million dollar project including remodeling the staircase to make it easier for visitors to climb and to climb, that was tough. and 26,000 more people visit each other. >> you climbed up and only made it up to the commissar i. >> alisyn: i was exhausted. >> clayton: can i get a coffee? and they put an elevator in there for handicapped individual who never before had a chance to go up and see a portion of the statue of liberty. today it could be open until it's closed later today by the federal government because of-- and meanwhile we have been talking over the last month what happened on september 11th of this year in libya. of course, our ambassador, a member of the embassy staff and two former navy seals were killed. jennifer griffin had
in the prestigious journal cycle science, americans are happier when national wealth is distributed more evenly than when it is distributed unevenly. that's why hurricane sandy isn't a distraction from this election. it's actually at the heart of it. it's about the kind of society that we wish to imagine for ourselves. and here is how the president described it just an hour ago as he visited the red cross. >> during the darkness of the storm, i think we also saw what's brightest in america. nurses at nyu hospital carrying fragile newborns to safety. we've seen incredibly brave firefighters in queens waist-deep in water battling interknoi infern rn
science guy. i have to tell you, michael bloomberg is an opportunist. you violated the new york city charter by running for a third term as mayor. we are in a very dire state here and i wish republicans run the country would offer us new york republicans help and an opportunity to really balance out the political system here. host: thank you for the call this morning. if a time for a few more calls. all weekend long we will be featuring the history and literary life of vermont capital city with a population of just about 8000 people. the smallest united states state capitol. here is the mayor talking about the city. [video clip] >> it is the smallest state capital and america. in terms of vermont, we have the largest historic district in the state. it is a very historic community, founded in 1791. it is run to about 20,000 during the day. largely because of the jobs that are here, the center of commerce and the area. we are fortunate here that we are somewhat insulated from a lot of the trends that occurred nationally. our economy is pretty stable because we rely on the state as a pr
to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amount of your time, effort and largesse to the cause. you wouldn't be here otherwise. so, let's talk a little bit or think a little bit if i can motivate you to do that about this business of our government and our military capabilities and what they can do. as i mentioned, you saw a little tiny blip in the video. i still believe that the biggest thing and the most powerful thing and fastest thing the military can bring to the table is disaster response. we have the capability to move quickly and to do things to make a difference. however, there are lots of other things we can do and facilitate, and that is o
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to me, relationships matter. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. [ male announcer ] with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and you never need a referral to see a specialist. so don't wait. call now and request this free decision guide to help you better understand medicare... and which aarp
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. flavor, meet food. it's time for swanson flavor boost. concentrated broth in easy to use packets. mix it into skillet dishes, for an instant dose of... hell-o! [ female announcer ] get recipes at flavorboost.com. >> bret: the worst of the storm has passed in the northeast. now comes the clean-up. and the rebuild. all of that takes time. material and money. chief washington correspondent james rosen looks at the relief efforts. >> it's going to be a very large response to covering multiple states. the biggest thing i'm concerned about is the power outals. >> it's not home. but it's been made pretty comfortable for us. the national guard and the red cross here have been super. >> james and kimberly levine joined by the dogs were among the 650 delaware residents who took refuge monday night in seven shelters. the american red cross operates across the first state. this, the del mar station is special needs facility, offering not only a lively kennel, but emotional counselors, nurses, medical technician ab
subsidies anymore. the national academy of sciences has said that any level of radiation from a nuclear power plant is dangerous to our health. so we need to be moving forward. the costs of nuclear power are socialized, and the health care costs that we have are people that are exposed to radiation. i do support, i support governor cuomo's efforts and to support a transition to renewable clean energy economy, and save economy that does not rely on fossil fuels or nuclear power. >> moderator: dan maffei, would you support what the governor wants to do by closing indian point? maffei: there's no question we have to get to work towards a clean energy a comic book we're doing a lot of that research right here in central new york, our universities or at the clean tech center, at the tech garden. in terms of nuclear power, well, we do need to make sure that nuclear power is safe and make sure that it's environmentally sound. i'm not sure we done that yet, but it wouldn't get rid of it until a gotten rid of coal and oil first. oil that we're dependent on other countries for, that we are behold
. there was a very controversial position i took at the time. i am going to be driven by the science. i agree with what mr. gregg said. the natural resources defense council ranked two of the beaches among best in the country for two years in a row. >> do have any advice on how to deal with these issues in the state? >> one of the students is my daughter. she is interested in these issues. i think delaware is a tremendous place. we have beautiful places, a beautiful environment and we have to work hard to make sure we're protecting that. i think a great environment is a bonus in terms of economic development. gov. peterson past the coastal zone act. people thought that was an economic -- it was an anti-jobs. it turned out to be the opposite. because we have such a beautiful delaware bay, businesses want to be here. that is why we're fake -- focused on the bayshore initiative. one of the objections i have is the thing of the power plant in the coastal zone. the pollutants are sulfur trade we have done is we have waived the requirement to put that manufacturing facility in the coastal zone. we
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)